Far from the Scenes of Birth and Youth…

It is at Kensal Green Cemetery in West London on May 21 1860 that Annabella was laid to rest and despite the incorrect spelling of her first name and that she had been born in the home of her mother's great friend Isabella Baker at Elemore Hall, her simple and elegant grave can be discovered in the shadow of the enormous Dissenter's Chapel. And one glorious afternoon in October I took a stroll through this fabulous cemetery to the grave of Byron's spouse...

Thursday’s Angel Child HAS Far to Go!

More than 228 years have now passed since that ‘involuntary Act of coming into the World’ for May 17 is the birthday of Anne Isabella, Lady Noel Byron, the Poet’s ‘Princess of Parallelograms’ and the woman he later said was ‘born for my destruction.’ Born on Ascension Day in 1792 in County Durham, she was the cherished only child of Sir Ralph and the Hon. Judith Milbanke who had lived through a marriage of over 15 years, childlessness and hope in anticipation of the arrival of their ‘’little angel’...

Blest Her! The Angel Suffers No More…

"Oh! my God! how has my poor Child been sacrificed! not only to a wicked, but unmanly Creature!" The agitated author of this letter was the Hon. Judith Noel in the dying days of January 1816 as the marriage separation between her beloved only daughter and Lord Byron became increasingly acrimonious and as the latter prepared for a life in exile far away from the marital home of 13 Piccadilly Terrace in London. However, Judith was QUITE mistaken in her distraught prediction about her 'poor child's' imminent demise...

I Have Suffered! Can It EVER Be Known?

George Colman the Younger was the theatrical manager at Drury Lane and a wonderful writer of comedy who considered Lord Byron a friend and as they got drunk together on more than one occasion and he had an intuitive understanding of the complexities of the Byron marriage and the subsequent separation - perhaps his poem finally offers us a tantalising hint of what happened all those years ago?

‘Tis a Pity There Were Three of Us!

By April 1816 Annabella having already contemplated the vagaries, distress and challenge that her brief marriage of one year to Byron had brought her and having made her decision to leave in February 1816, the 'Suffering Angel' was to remain formidable in her resolution and the process towards Annabella's desire to be 'securely separated' from Lord Byron over 200 years ago was reaching an increasingly bitter, fraught and heart breaking conclusion...

Bravo! Artful BUT Perfectly Incompatible!

I have long loved the energy and originality of this album and my favourite song is 'Stay Too Long' and the lyrics remain rather apt at this time for our broken-hearted poet as the turmoil of his marital separation from Annabella continued to dominate his life over 203 years ago. In January 1816 Annabella left her spouse and returned to the protection of her parents who duly offered their support in her resolution for a legal separation and Byron was never to learn the reason for her refusal to return to him and despite his letters asking her to state the reasons for leaving him; it appears that she never did...

A Bad Romance? I WANT Revenge!

The story of Byron's brief marriage lasted some 54 weeks and until her death in 1860, Lady Byron, the estranged wife was to spend a further 44 years ensuring that the story of her marriage was told and was continued to be told by her family and supporters for many years after - and it remains a story that continues to be told today...