‘Tis a Pity There Were Three of Us!

By April 1816 Annabella having already contemplated the vagaries, distress and challenge that her brief marriage of one year to Byron had brought her and having made her decision to leave in February 1816, the 'Suffering Angel' was to remain formidable in her resolution and the process towards Annabella's desire to be 'securely separated' from Lord Byron over 200 years ago was reaching an increasingly bitter, fraught and heart breaking conclusion...

Bravo! Artful BUT Perfectly Incompatible!

I have long loved the energy and originality of this album and my favourite song is 'Stay Too Long' and the lyrics remain rather apt at this time for our broken-hearted poet as the turmoil of his marital separation from Annabella continued to dominate his life over 203 years ago. In January 1816 Annabella left her spouse and returned to the protection of her parents who duly offered their support in her resolution for a legal separation and Byron was never to learn the reason for her refusal to return to him and despite his letters asking her to state the reasons for leaving him; it appears that she never did...

Cheers! I Could Murder a Drink!

At the time of his marriage, Byron's creditors believed that as he had married a heiress, he would now be in a position to settle his debts as the newly married couple had also moved into the very grand house in London. However, by autumn in 1815, the bailiff beckoned, the sale of his precious library was initiated and executions were threatened and implemented and faced with all this,  Byron in his worry and torment did what many have done in that he got drunk AND frequently!

A Bad Romance? I WANT Revenge!

The story of Byron's brief marriage lasted some 54 weeks and until her death in 1860, Lady Byron, the estranged wife was to spend a further 44 years ensuring that the story of her marriage was told and was continued to be told by her family and supporters for many years after - and it remains a story that continues to be told today...

Behold the Blessings of Lady Noel – Damn!

As we know that no one lives forever - the Lady Noel was no exception for a mere seven months after Lord B's most facetious letter - his Mamma-At-Law died on Monday January 28 in 1822. Byron was not to receive the news of Judith Noel's death until early March from Augusta and true to his detestation of 'cant', his response was brutally frank...

A Preamble to Matrimony…

Described by the late, great Byron Scholar, Peter Cochran as a 'masterpiece of circumlocution' - Byron's second proposal of marriage in September 1814 would lay the foundation stone for his eventual exile from our shores in 1816...

I Once More Remind You…

The author of this missive is one Elizabeth Medora Leigh writing about the kindness of her aunt Lady Byron who had just informed her that her father was none other than the celebrated poet AND uncle, Lord Byron. Born on this day April 15 in 1814, Elizabeth Medora was the fourth child of the Hon. Augusta Mary Byron and Colonel George Leigh and arguably THE most notorious...