Far from the Scenes of Birth and Youth…

It is at Kensal Green Cemetery in West London on May 21 1860 that Annabella was laid to rest and despite the incorrect spelling of her first name and that she had been born in the home of her mother's great friend Isabella Baker at Elemore Hall, her simple and elegant grave can be discovered in the shadow of the enormous Dissenter's Chapel. And one glorious afternoon in October I took a stroll through this fabulous cemetery to the grave of Byron's spouse...

Bravo! Artful BUT Perfectly Incompatible!

I have long loved the energy and originality of this album and my favourite song is 'Stay Too Long' and the lyrics remain rather apt at this time for our broken-hearted poet as the turmoil of his marital separation from Annabella continued to dominate his life over 203 years ago. In January 1816 Annabella left her spouse and returned to the protection of her parents who duly offered their support in her resolution for a legal separation and Byron was never to learn the reason for her refusal to return to him and despite his letters asking her to state the reasons for leaving him; it appears that she never did...

Cheers! I Could Murder a Drink!

At the time of his marriage, Byron's creditors believed that as he had married a heiress, he would now be in a position to settle his debts as the newly married couple had also moved into the very grand house in London. However, by autumn in 1815, the bailiff beckoned, the sale of his precious library was initiated and executions were threatened and implemented and faced with all this,  Byron in his worry and torment did what many have done in that he got drunk AND frequently!