Cheers! I Could Murder a Drink!

At the time of his marriage, Byron's creditors believed that as he had married a heiress, he would now be in a position to settle his debts as the newly married couple had also moved into the very grand house in London. However, by autumn in 1815, the bailiff beckoned, the sale of his precious library was initiated and executions were threatened and implemented and faced with all this,  Byron in his worry and torment did what many have done in that he got drunk AND frequently!

A Bad Romance? I WANT Revenge!

The story of Byron's brief marriage lasted some 54 weeks and until her death in 1860, Lady Byron, the estranged wife was to spend a further 44 years ensuring that the story of her marriage was told and was continued to be told by her family and supporters for many years after - and it remains a story that continues to be told today...

Dearest Duck, It’s Over! Love Pippin…

Yes, February is the month for a profusion of chocolates, expensive red roses and some very dubious Valentine's cards but oh, what a month of anticipation as Cupid's Arrow flies forth! However, sadly not for the poet Lord Byron as February 1816 would be the month that his wife would unceremoniously ditch him!

Behold the Blessings of Lady Noel – Damn!

As we know that no one lives forever - the Lady Noel was no exception for a mere seven months after Lord B's most facetious letter - his Mamma-At-Law died on Monday January 28 in 1822. Byron was not to receive the news of Judith Noel's death until early March from Augusta and true to his detestation of 'cant', his response was brutally frank...

Taking My Leave of Number 13?

On the eve of her departure Annabella had confided in her former governess Mrs Clermont that "if ever I should be fool enough to be persuaded to return I shall never leave his house alive" - however, some 198 years later in January of 2014, the doors of 13 Piccadilly Terrace reopened; albeit in 12th scale for a feature in the Dolls' House Magazine for GMC Publications...

Far from the Scenes of Birth and Youth…

It is at Kensal Green Cemetery in West London on May 21 1860 that Annabella was laid to rest and despite the incorrect spelling of her first name and that she had been born in the home of her mother's great friend Isabella Baker at Elemore Hall, her simple and elegant grave can be discovered in the shadow of the enormous Dissenter's Chapel. And one glorious afternoon in October I took a stroll through this fabulous cemetery to the grave of Byron's spouse...

Blest Her! The Angel Suffers No More…

"Oh! my God! how has my poor Child been sacrificed! not only to a wicked, but unmanly Creature!"
The agitated author of this letter was the Hon. Judith Noel in the dying days of January 1816 as the marriage separation between her beloved only daughter and Lord Byron became increasingly acrimonious and as the latter prepared for a life in exile far away from the marital home of 13 Piccadilly Terrace in London.
However, Judith was QUITE mistaken in her distraught prediction about her 'poor child's' imminent demise...